Committee on the Use of Human Subjects (CUHSR/IRB)

PROPOSAL ID:3674
TITLE:EXAMINING THE INFLUENCE OF CRUCIBLE EXPERIENCES AND SUICIDALITY ON THE RESILIENCE OF BIPOC WOMEN
PRINCIPLE INVESTIGATOR:CHANCE, NUCHELLE
PSYCHOLOGY
(816) 271-5844
NCHANCE@MISSOURIWESTERN.EDU
OTHER INVESTIGATORS:MARIAN MONTIEL (MMONTIEL@MISSOURIWESTERN.EDU) RNLATONYA MITCHELL (LMITCHELL9@MISSOURIWESTERN.EDU) RNDEMETRIUS CHANCE (DCHANCE3@MISSOURIWESTERN.EDU)RNANDRE WIGGINS (AWIGGINSJR@MISSOURIWESTERN.EDU)RNJASON HOLLIMAN (JHOLLIMAN1@MISSOURIWESTERN.EDU)
IRB SUMMARY: File Created: April 2, 2022
Department Chair Action Date: April 2, 2022
Current Status: Expedited Approval Granted
Action Date: April 9, 2022
Approval Expiration Date: April 9, 2023
Confidentiality Data are not linked to individuals

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

The purpose of this study is to examine the influences of negative life experiences and suicidality on the resilience of BIPOC women. Previous research shows that the mental health needs of BIPOC people have been unmet and yield compounded health risks such as suicide. Racial and ethnic groups differ in their access to culturally appropriate behavioral health treatment, historical trauma, and other factors that may be related to suicide risk. However, BIPOC women have been traditionally expected to be symbols of strength and unity in their families and cultures (Chance, 2021; Kosmicki, 2017; Liao et al., 2020). Research further shows that increased resilience is a protective factor against mental illness and suicide The need for a better understanding of the underlying causes of suicidal behavior among BIPOC persons is critical. Understanding racial and ethnic differences in rates of suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts are essential for more effectively directing suicide prevention efforts and overall mental wellness (Allbaugh et al., 2017; Holliman et al., 2018; Hollman & Williams, 2020). [Link to appendices: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1GOdh3CRlelsRmYGcJmMok2e10W4NdMMXy6CGqImLIkA/edit?usp=sharing]

STATEMENT OF RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Participants will complete an online survey via google forms that will have four distinct parts. Participants will provide background information about themselves in a demographics section (Appendix B), take the Negative Life Experiences Survey (Appendix C), the Connor-Davidson Resilience survey (Appendix D), and a suicidality questionnaire (Appendix E). The online survey should take participants about 15-20 minutes to complete.

ANTICIPATED RISKS AND BENEFITS

There are no direct benefits of participation in this study. Participants will, however, you will be contributing to the field of psychology and mental health. Although the researchers have tried to avoid risks, participants may feel that some of the questions that they are asked are stressful or upsetting. If so, they do not have to answer anything emotionally disturbing. If a participant becomes upset at the line of questioning they are informed by the consent that they can exit the survey at any time. Since the researchers are not diving deep into the specifics of the participants' personal experiences with these topics, they deem this risk is minimal. However, the societal benefits accrued from this study far outweigh the risks. We will further encourage the participants in the debriefing to actively seek mental health counseling and emotional support if this survey or life, in general, has been troubling.

SUBJECT SELECTION

We will be recruiting from the general population, female-identifying participants aged 18+ using multi-modal recruiting. Although we plan to recruit broadly via personal and professional networks including social media, we further intend to recruit from the MWSU student body using email and word of mouth tactics. This allows for faster data collection, larger samples, cost reductions, and more diverse populations. The benefit of these varied tactics is access to a larger population pool. In addition, by using online recruiting, our sample should be more like the general population, thus, we may be better able to generalize our results.

CONFIDENTIALITY

No personally identifiable will be collected. The records of this study will be kept private. No identifiers linking you to this study will be included in any report that might be published. Research records will be stored securely and only the principal investigators: Dr. Nuchelle Chance and the members of Take A Chance Social Science Research Lab.

[ IRB HOMEPAGE ]

Any questions about proposals, procedures, etc. should be directed to the chair of the CUHSR